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March 5, 2013

“Growing up in Mexico City, Pati Jinich wanted to be a lot of things: a writer, a philosopher, an academic. ‘In my family, I was the youngest. I was labeled the academic,’ said the woman who did indeed grow up to write, philosophize and intently study various issues in a career as a Latin American public policy analyst.

The one thing Jinich hadn’t banked on was a career in food. But that’s what happened when her life shifted gears from think-tank wonk to Mexican food ambassador as host of the popular public television cooking show ‘Pati’s Mexican Table.’ Chef, cooking teacher, food writer (and mother of three), Jinich has emerged as one of the most passionate and articulate proponents of the simple joys of Mexican home cooking…”

To read the entire article, click here.

March 5, 2013

“Pati Jinich didn’t grow up to be a chef, although she comes from a family of accomplished cooks. She dedicated her life to politics until seven years ago when she decided she would celebrate and demystify Mexican recipes ‘without compromising their soul’…”

To read the entire article, click here.

March 5, 2013

I showed noon anchor JC Hayward how easy it is to make Chipotle Mashed Potatoes on WUSA9 DC. I think she liked them!  If you didn’t catch me on the air, watch the video here…


March 4, 2013

“Pati Jinich, a chef on the ‘Mexican Table’ TV show on the PBS channel, has a very different idea of Mexican food than most people are used to.

‘Everyone knows tacos and burritos but not everyone knows the wholesome, fresh home-style cooking I grew up eating,’ Jinich said. ‘This isn’t greasy or labor-intensive; it’s the traditional cooking I knew’…”

To read the entire article, click here.

February 14, 2012

“Every few months, my family gets together with a Latin group of friends and their families for a potluck.

This winter it was our turn. As tradition goes, the host brings the main dishes to the table and the others bring the rest. I eagerly announced my plans to share Mexican casseroles, also called cazuelas, budines or pasteles. The Mexicans couldn’t hide their joy — ‘Pati! De veras? Budin Azteca? Cazuela de Tamal?!’ — and quickly thought of other ‘very’ Mexican sides to pair with them. The Argentines and Costa Ricans tried to understand what ‘Mexican casserole’ meant and whether it was supposed to be any good…”

To read the entire article, click here.

February 9, 2010

“Avocados are, to me, among the most sensuous, luscious and luxurious of ingredients. Add how delicious, soft and subtly flavored they are, and you get a clear winner for Valentine’s Day.

Despite the many pounds of avocados we go through at home each week, regardless of the infinite number of cases I use for events at Washington, D.C.’s Mexican Cultural Institute, and notwithstanding that my sisters and I used them for hair and face treatments as we were growing up (all those nurturing natural oils and vitamins), I still find avocados to be wow-inducing…”

To read the entire article, click here.

January 13, 2010

“Right off the bat, you must understand: I heart chorizo. Especially the kind I grew up eating in Mexico. It comes in deep-burnt-reddish links of fresh, moist, exotically seasoned ground meat that, once fried, becomes crisp and filling bites with bold flavors and a thousand uses.

My oldest son’s quick choice for breakfast is chorizo fried just until it browns and crisps, with a side of white toast. Add some lightly beaten eggs as the chorizo is starting to brown and some ripe and creamy avocado slices on the side, and that’s my kind of rich-tasting brunch dish. Of course chorizo is delicious in sandwiches, in tacos and quesadillas, on top of enchiladas, in mashed potatoes, as a topping for heartier salads, in some of the tastiest bean dishes I have tried, in pastas with a ton of personality and on pizzas with pickled jalapeño peppers on top…”

To read the entire article, click here.

November 4, 2009

“You know how some people become attached to a certain dish? They try it somewhere once and then want to go back to eat it again and again, or they make it at home repeatedly in an until-death-do-us-part kind of vow? Well, I am one of those people, and I have made that vow with quite a few dishes from the Mexican state of Michoacan.

It surprises me how Michoacan’s cuisine has remained such a well-kept secret. It has a defined personality and a complex layering of delicious flavors like the more popular cuisines from Oaxaca and Puebla, but its dishes seem to be a bit more comforting and use fewer ingredients…”

To read the entire article, click here.

August 5, 2009

“When asked recently whether I was a collector of some sort, I thought of my grandmother’s cabinet that holds hundreds of elephant figurines — more than 60 years’ worth, from many places. And she’s still adding to the lot. So my response was no.

Then a few days later I realized that I am a collector: of foods tasted throughout my life, or at least the memories of them. This is especially true of salsas. I have countless papers scattered on my desk with notes about the names of them, the places I ate them, their ingredients, the cooks who made them and, when generously given, directions on how to re-create them…”

To read the entire article, click here.

July 22, 2009

“Growing up in Mexico City, my sisters and I used to prepare exotic meals, perfumes and potions for the inhabitants of our enchanted forest. That was our dog, the bluebird, snails, butterflies and ladybugs that happened to peek into our backyard and witness our extravagant mess. It also included any family friend who happened to stop by and become a willing victim. We sometimes offered cooking classes, too.

My mother set us up in the backyard on a big blanket with random pots and pans, while she cooked laborious weekend meals. There was a fig tree, an apple tree, a peach tree, a couple of what we called Chinese orange trees, and tons of azaleas and herbs that offered an immense array of witchcrafting material. But among our most prized ingredients were dried jamaica (pronounced ha-may-kah) flowers, known in the U.S. as hibiscus flowers, stored in a big jar in the kitchen…”

To read the entire article, click here.

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